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The

Alaska Gasline Development Corporation

is developing a gas transportation and LNG export project in Alaska.

For more details, please visit:

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Alaska LNG Environmental Reports

The Alaska LNG Project will soon finalize 13 resource reports that provide information for the regulators and the general public about the project.

Making Alaska’s natural gas liquefaction megaproject a reality requires a lot of careful planning—about 10,000 pages worth, to be exact. The purpose of these reports is two-fold: first, project teams must identify the proposed project footprint, the potential effects during construction and operation, and recommended mitigation measures to minimize those effects. Second, the reports provide the necessary information needed by regulatory agencies to make sound regulatory decisions.

Drawing from four years of field work, the reports are comprehensive—addressing not only topics such as wildlife, water, noise and air quality but also including Alaska Native cultural resources, socioeconomics, visual aesthetics and recreation. The reports detail current environmental conditions within the project footprint identified through the project’s field work as well as relevant information collected by others, and use rigorous models to predict potential impacts. The reports look back at what has been and look ahead to the future to build the best project that efficiently develops Alaska’s natural gas for the benefit of all residents.

The upcoming round of resource reports includes updated engineering and design work, new field studies data, and input from stakeholders. Feedback from the general public and interested parties is an essential part of the planning and regulatory process, and your thoughts and opinions about the second draft resource reports are welcome.

Once the reports are submitted to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), they will be available online for public review. The FERC may also hold meetings in a variety of communities to solicit public input.

General Project Description

This report provides an overview of the project, its construction and operations plans, and big-picture timetables for construction, along with a map of the proposed infrastructure, including the 800 mile proposed pipeline route from the North Slope to the Nikiski LNG plant. A list of permits and approvals required from regulatory agencies is appended to this resource report.

Water Use and Quality

The report will identify the existing groundwater and surface water resources, and describe the project’s water use requirements for the Nikiski LNG facility, the North Slope gas treatment plant, and facilities along the pipeline corridor. Identification of construction procedures and mitigation measures are also included for locations where streams or rivers may be crossed by the pipeline. The report will also identify wetlands potentially affected temporarily or permanently by project infrastructure and measures taken to minimize these effects during construction.

Fish, Wildlife, and Vegetation

This report describes existing fish, wildlife and vegetation species in the project area. It assesses potential effects to these resources from project construction and operations and proposes mitigation measures to minimize those effects in the project area. Impacts on protected fish and wildlife species are important aspects covered in this report.

Cultural Resources

This report describes the identification and protection of Alaska Native traditional cultural sites and other historic properties within the proposed project area. To protect the sites, specific cultural resource locations are not disclosed in this report but are reported to the Office of History and Archaeology’s State Historical Preservation Office (OHA/SHPO) and FERC. Information about FERC meetings will be available on both aklng.com and ferc.gov.

Socioeconomics

At more than 3,500 pages, Resource Report No. 5 is one of the most broad-ranging resource reports and discusses the communities potentially affected by project construction and operations. Socioeconomic factors include population, employment, income, housing, health care, emergency services, law enforcement, utilities (water, sewage, solid waste and energy), government revenues and expenditures including schools and transportation (highway, rail, marine and air), land use, tourism, subsistence and public health.

The report will also look at the project’s socioeconomic benefits to communities as well as the State. Given the enormous scale of the project and its potential importance to the Alaska economy, the direct socioeconomic effects of the project would be experienced statewide. These effects would include employment, fiscal and energy supply effects. The project would also generate revenues for the State of Alaska through production taxes, royalties, income taxes, and payments in lieu of property taxes. All of these are addressed in Resource Report 5.

The Alaska LNG Project is working with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and other experts to conduct subsistence harvest surveys, subsistence mapping and traditional knowledge interviews in communities potentially affected by the project. The results of that work are documented in Resource Report 5. Additionally, the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services is preparing a health impact assessment for the project that will be appended to Resource Report 5.

Geological Resources

This report examines geological features associated with the potential project area. Geohazards, such as earthquake faults and unstable soils, will be addressed, as will gravel sites for the millions of cubic yards of material that would be needed for construction. The report includes a preliminary gravel sourcing plan and outlines potential reclamation measures.

Soils

Pipeline construction through permafrost will be covered in the report, as will handling material from dredging operations at the Prudhoe Bay dock and equipment offloading facility proposed for the LNG plant site at Nikiski.

Land Use Recreation and Aesthetics

The report examines the use of land affected by the project, including private, public lands as well as designated recreational areas or other special use areas. The potential effects to tourism during construction will also be addressed in this resource report. To the extent practicable, the project footprint would avoid recreational areas, and when that is not possible, the project will work with land managers and local organizations to develop site-specific plans.

Air and Noise Quality

This report shares data about existing air quality and predicts potential air emissions during construction and operations. The models, which are reviewed by the State of Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation and the Environmental Protection Agency, make hourly predictions at about 10,000 gridded locations in the project vicinity. As Alaska’s largest project to date, the operation of the pipeline and related facilities will require a lot of fuel. The report also describes existing sound measurements, identifies potential sound levels associated with applicable equipment and those measures or equipment controls proposed to reduce sound levels.

Alternatives

The LNG plant site and pipeline route alternatives considered by the project and raised by regulators and the public will be addressed in the report, including the best way to thread the pipeline through sensitive areas of the state. This resource report also goes into detail about why Nikiski is the preferred location for the potential liquefaction facility. All alter-natives evaluated must conform to the purpose and need of the project.

Reliability and Safety

This report will outline the safety and reliability mechanisms supporting construction and operations of all Alaska LNG facilities including the Nikiski LNG plant which is in proximity of other oil and gas industrial plants and residential properties. Safety issues and mechanisms for building and operating the 800- mile natural gas pipeline will also be discussed.

PCB Contamination

Per discussions with the FERC, PCB contamination is not expected to be encountered for this project and this report is not considered to be applicable to the Alaska LNG Project.

Engineering and Design Material

The most technical of the reports, this report contains the engineering detail for facilities design and includes substantial descriptions about storage tanks, piping and instrumentation and applicable codes and standards for the entire LNG facility.

Socioeconomics

At more than 3,500 pages, Resource Report No. 5 is one of the most broad-ranging resource reports and discusses the communities potentially affected by project construction and operations. Socioeconomic factors include population, employment, income, housing, health care, emergency services, law enforcement, utilities (water, sewage, solid waste and energy), government revenues and expenditures including schools and transportation (highway, rail, marine and air), land use, tourism, subsistence and public health.

The report will also look at the project’s socioeconomic benefits to communities as well as the State. Given the enormous scale of the project and its potential importance to the Alaska economy, the direct socioeconomic effects of the project would be experienced statewide.

These effects would include employment, fiscal and energy supply effects. The project would also generate revenues for the State of Alaska through production taxes, royalties, income taxes, and payments in lieu of property taxes. All of these are addressed in Resource Report 5.

The Alaska LNG Project is working with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and other experts to conduct subsistence harvest surveys, subsistence mapping and traditional knowledge interviews in communities potentially affected by the project. The results of that work are documented in Resource Report 5. Additionally, the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services is preparing a health impact assessment for the project that will be appended to Resource Report 5.


Project Map

The Alaska LNG Project is anchored by the Prudhoe Bay and Point Thomson fields. These fields are expected to deliver on average about 3.5 billion cubic feet of gas per day with about 75% from the Prudhoe Bay field and 25% from the Point Thomson field.

Locate a detailed section of your community along the proposed pipeline route on our interactive map.

CLICK HERE